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Mediaeval Monsters, by Damien Kempf and Maria L. Gilbert

Reviewed by John Rimmer

The various monsters and mysterious creatures described in this book need not detain cryptozoologists using Brian Parson’s excellent guide to monster hunting that was recently reviewed in Magonia, as these mystery animals exist only in the pages of medieval manuscripts, mostly from the British Library.

But in mediaeval times monsters . . . → Read More: Mediaeval Monsters, by Damien Kempf and Maria L. Gilbert

Where the White Stag Runs

Boundary And Transformation In Deer Myth

By Ari Berk

[Snip] At this time of the year, the deer venture often into our realm. Last night in my front yard, a herd of deer—thick and wooly–looking with their winter coats—were feeding on fallen rowan berries. This morning, their tracks could be seen making spirals in the . . . → Read More: Where the White Stag Runs

Patupaiarehe–The Fairy Folk of New Zealand

By Toni-maree Rowe

[Snip] In Maori tradition the Patupaiarehe (also sometimes referred to as turehu or pakepakeha) were the first people of New Zealand – the first Tangata Whenua. They are supernatural beings who are rarely seen, fairy creatures of the deep forests and mountains. Their houses built of swirling mists.

They have light skin, . . . → Read More: Patupaiarehe–The Fairy Folk of New Zealand

The Norse King’s Sorcerous Daughter

By Pollyanna Jones

Folklore is a funny thing. Many of the tales are old stories, passed down through the generations orally until someone, a collector of sorts, decided to write them down.

Some of these describe tales of a place, legends to explain its existence or creation. Others tell of ghosts or beasties, things to . . . → Read More: The Norse King’s Sorcerous Daughter

The Witch of Treva – A Cornish Legend

By Pollyanna Jones

Cornwall lies on the south west tip of the British Isles, and is considered by many to be one of the Celtic nations. With its own language and distinct culture, the Kingdom, or Duchy of Cornwall, has it’s own strong identity that is embellished by its wealth of folklore.

Witches and pellers . . . → Read More: The Witch of Treva – A Cornish Legend

The Ritual behind Wishing Wells

Buying Favors and Good Fortune

By Beth

The modern Western world is familiar with the concept of wishing wells, or bodies of water in which currency, most commonly in the form of coin, is tossed with the intention of making a wish. Some towns even host a fountain in the town square or epicenter in . . . → Read More: The Ritual behind Wishing Wells

Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker

How a Fairy-Tale Character Fooled the World for 300 Years

Reviewed by Kevin Murphy

All of us are familiar with fairy tales, usually associated with a warm glow of childhood memories when we first heard them, and then heard them again and again. They are somehow imbued in our consciousness as enduring archetypes and metaphors . . . → Read More: Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker

Solar Eclipse Superstitions

By Pollyanna Jones

The goings on of the heavens have always drawn our interest. A solar eclipse is a rare and incredible event where the moon passes across the face of the sun in its orbit around the earth. Our understanding of the solar system now explains this phenomenon, but in times past, an eclipse . . . → Read More: Solar Eclipse Superstitions

Religio-cultural Shifts and the Elfin Casualities

By Carolyn Emerick

[Snip] Most of us who have more than a cursory knowledge of folklore understand that the popular notion of a “fairy” today is completely different than in earlier eras, and that the fae were often considered very dangerous, and even as evil beings by Church authorities. What I hadn’t realized, however, . . . → Read More: Religio-cultural Shifts and the Elfin Casualities

Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker

Reviewed by Nimue Brown

I did not really expect to be convinced by Jerri Studebaker’s book about finding signs of ancient Goddess worship in fairy tales. I’m just not the sort of person who is easily persuaded by much, and the sleight of hand history of Dr Anne Ross, and the chicanery of Robert Graves . . . → Read More: Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker