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Avebury Cosmos, by Nicholas R. Mann

Reviewed by Nimue Brown

[Snip] Nicholas Mann’s Avebury Cosmos is a fascinating book. As the title suggests, it’s very much about archaeo-astronomy, working out how the night sky would have looked at the time of building, and the different stages of development around Avebury, from its early beginnings at the Windmill Hill settlement, through to . . . → Read More: Avebury Cosmos, by Nicholas R. Mann

Housing the Chosen, by Inge Nielsen

The Architectural Context of Mystery Groups and Religious Associations in the Ancient World

Reviewed by Valentino Gasparini

This is the second volume of a new series Contextualizing the Sacred, edited by Elizabeth Frood (University of Oxford) and Rubina Raja (Aarhus Universitet). A much shorter version is due to be published this March in the forthcoming . . . → Read More: Housing the Chosen, by Inge Nielsen

Religion Laid Bear, by Alan Leddon

Reviewed by Erin Lale

Religion Laid Bear by Alan Leddon is both a history of the ancient bear cult and a guide for modern pagans, heathens, and shamans to bear spirituality. It examines forty deities descended from the ancient bear god. The book also includes rituals and other information for the modern practitioner.

Leddon postulates . . . → Read More: Religion Laid Bear, by Alan Leddon

The Angel and the Abyss, by J. Daniel Gunther

Reviewed by Gesigewigu’s

In 2009 J. Daniel Gunther published Initiation in the Aeon of the Child, Book I of his Inward Journey series, and it was a great book. (Ed note: See Ges’ earlier review of Initiation in the Aeon of the Child.) Now five years later he releases The Angel and the Abyss, Book . . . → Read More: The Angel and the Abyss, by J. Daniel Gunther

Pagan Portals: The Morrigan

Reviewed by Jennifer Lawrence

Although the original peoples that worshipped the Morrigan have been in the ground for centuries and are long since dust, that is not the same thing as saying that the goddess herself is gone. Indeed, she has never truly been gone, but over the last year or two, there has been . . . → Read More: Pagan Portals: The Morrigan

On Divination, by Galina Krasskova

Reviewed by Jennifer Lawrence

To begin with: this book does not teach the reader to read the Tarot, the runes, ogham, the bones, palms, tea leaves, entrails, the flight of birds, the I Ching, or any of a myriad of other divinatory methods. In only one way is it a how-to book on divination: it . . . → Read More: On Divination, by Galina Krasskova

Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker

How a Fairy-Tale Character Fooled the World for 300 Years

Reviewed by Kevin Murphy

All of us are familiar with fairy tales, usually associated with a warm glow of childhood memories when we first heard them, and then heard them again and again. They are somehow imbued in our consciousness as enduring archetypes and metaphors . . . → Read More: Breaking the Mother Goose Code, by Jeri Studebaker

All Acts of Love and Pleasure – Inclusive Wicca

Reviewed by Lisa Roling

[Snip] Aburrow begins by stating “[t]he aim of the book is to act as a guide to existing initiatory covens who want to make their practice more inclusive.” She says that inclusive Wicca is not a specific tradition but is “about including all participants regardless of sexual orientation, disability, or other . . . → Read More: All Acts of Love and Pleasure – Inclusive Wicca

The Magiculum, by Todd Landman (ed.)

Reviewed by Psyche

Editor Todd Landman decided he’d like to create a magiculum vitae, a sort of magical resume, and became interested what such a thing would look like among those of his friends and associates. Landman invited them to write essays about their experiences, and the only guideline seems to have been three questions: . . . → Read More: The Magiculum, by Todd Landman (ed.)

Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World

Reviewed by Steven Posch

[Snip] In Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World: Eostre, Hreda, and the Cult of Matrons, Philip A. Shaw, lecturer in English and Old English at Leicester University, in a work surprisingly readable for all its dense erudition, attempts to stake out a centrist ground midway between maximalist and minimalist positions. . . . → Read More: Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World