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Naga Magick, by Denny Sargent

Reviewed by Jan Malique

Naga Magick is an interesting find on many levels. Denny Sargent has written an erudite and fascinating glimpse into a world at once mysterious and paradoxical.

Naga Magick began life as a research project which then blossomed into this book. As a practicing tantric and historian, Denny Sargent can speak with . . . → Read More: Naga Magick, by Denny Sargent

Mediaeval Monsters, by Damien Kempf and Maria L. Gilbert

Reviewed by John Rimmer

The various monsters and mysterious creatures described in this book need not detain cryptozoologists using Brian Parson’s excellent guide to monster hunting that was recently reviewed in Magonia, as these mystery animals exist only in the pages of medieval manuscripts, mostly from the British Library.

But in mediaeval times monsters . . . → Read More: Mediaeval Monsters, by Damien Kempf and Maria L. Gilbert

Jesus the Magician, by Morton Smith

Reviewed by Gesigewigu’s

[Snip] This book does an excellent job of appealing to both “scholarship and literate laity,”1 both in structure and content. The breakdown of the book is clearly outlined so you can see how Smith will tackle the subject in a way that makes the text flow seamlessly, starting with the details of . . . → Read More: Jesus the Magician, by Morton Smith

Enchanting The Shadowlands, by Lorna Smithers

Reviewed by Rhyd Wildermuth

I don’t know how to compel a person, a stranger, regardless of their disposition towards my words, to read a book. But it’s not for that this review of Lorna Smither’s collection, Enchanting the Shadowlands, is so overdue, nor from any of the usual excuses of pre-occupation or inundation. That is, . . . → Read More: Enchanting The Shadowlands, by Lorna Smithers

Magie und Ritual bei Apollonios Rhodios, von Ingo Schaaf

Studien zu ihrer Form und Funktion in den Argonautika

Reviewed by Paul Ojennus

Ingo Schaaf offers an extensive and detailed examination of the treatment of magic and ritual in the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. This study fills an important gap in contemporary research on Apollonius, and it promises to place the scholarship on magic . . . → Read More: Magie und Ritual bei Apollonios Rhodios, von Ingo Schaaf

The Book of Lies, by Richard Metzger (ed.)

The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult

Reviewed by J Simpson

I don’t know about you, but when I hear the word “grimoire,” I think of dusty old tomes full of alchemical esoterica and glyphs in some cobwebbed book shoppe that smells of sandalwood, possibly helmed by a bearded man in a fez.

The . . . → Read More: The Book of Lies, by Richard Metzger (ed.)

Magia Sexualis, by Paschal Beverly Randolph

Reviewed by Psyche

Paschal Beverly Randolph‘s Magia Sexualis has often been called the most influential book about sex magick ever written. It survives through Maria de Naglowska‘s French translation and adaptation in an edition of 1,007 copies published more than 50 years after Randolph’s death.

Pashal Beverly Randolph (1825-1875) was an African American doctor, and . . . → Read More: Magia Sexualis, by Paschal Beverly Randolph

Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll

Reviewed by Trevor Pyne

[Snip] Rock and roll derives from that modern subset of music that was born from African-American slave beginnings, merging gradually with mainstream popular music via vaudeville then going on to shape the dominant genres of music consumed by the majority of the listening public. Therefore jazz, coupled with the timely invention . . . → Read More: Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll

The Amazons, by Adrienne Mayor

Reviewed by Tom Holland

[Snip] No one today believes that an army of female warriors really sailed from the Black Sea to attack Athens. If a historical basis for the legend has to be found, then it is likeliest to be a refraction of the invasions of Greece in the early fifth century BC by . . . → Read More: The Amazons, by Adrienne Mayor

A Guide to Irish Mythology, by Daragh Smyth

Reviewed by Celtic Scholar

Synopsis: This guide, structured alphabetically with a helpful cross-reference system, allows the reader to delve into the ornate world of Irish mythology and its four cycles of tales: the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster Cycle, the Fenian or Ossianic Cycle, and the Historical Cycle or Cycle of Kings. The characters associated with . . . → Read More: A Guide to Irish Mythology, by Daragh Smyth