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Mayan 2012 Predictions: Apocalypse or a Game of Telephone?

By Rick Kearns

Sunspots? Black holes? Comets? What will the apocalypse bring? To hear the New Agers tell it, we are doomed. But in the year running up to the next Winter Solstice, on December 21, 2012, the impending changeover to we know not what is already causing buzz, plus hotel reservations. But the voices . . . → Read More: Mayan 2012 Predictions: Apocalypse or a Game of Telephone?

The God Particle and Wisdom of the Ancients

Modern Science ‘Discovering’ What Our Indigenous Ancestors Surmised a Millennium Ago

By Ruth Hopkins

Before Galileo Galilei and Sir Isaac Newton, the Lakota studied astronomy. Many indigenous peoples did. They were natural scientists. What sets indigenous “ethnoastronomy” apart from mainstream western astronomy is native peoples didn’t feel the need to separate their spiritual beliefs from . . . → Read More: The God Particle and Wisdom of the Ancients

Reconciling Christianity and Native Beliefs

Richard Walker reviews Finding a Way Home: Indian and Catholic Spiritual Paths of the Plateau Tribes, by Patrick J. Twohy.

[Snip] In 1869 the Board of Indian Commissioners even noted in its annual report that where assimilating Indians was concerned, “the religion of our blessed Savior is…the most effective agent for the civilization of any . . . → Read More: Reconciling Christianity and Native Beliefs

How the Full Moons Got Their Names

By Joe Rao

The start of 2012 brings with it a new year of skywatching, and lunar enthusiasts are gearing up for a stunning lineup of full moons. But, where does the tradition of full moon names come from?

Full moon names date back to Native Americans of a few hundred years ago, of what . . . → Read More: How the Full Moons Got Their Names

Long Island Medicine Man Wants IRS to Sweat

By John Marzulu

n indian medicine man is accusing the tax man of crimping his ability to run a sweat lodge and other spiritual activities on a Long Island reservation, the Daily News has learned.

The IRS slapped Jonathan Smith with a $329,000 tax lien this year and the Shinnecock holy man is fighting back . . . → Read More: Long Island Medicine Man Wants IRS to Sweat

The Truth vs. Twilight: Quileute Website Explores Reality and Fiction

By Richard Walker

[Snip] For all of its popularity, the Twilight book and film series promotes several misconceptions about Quileute culture, Native people and women. The Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, in collaboration with the Quileute Nation, has launched a website, Truth versus Twilight, to counteract those misconceptions.

The site explores the class . . . → Read More: The Truth vs. Twilight: Quileute Website Explores Reality and Fiction

Mythology in the stars

By Robin Dudgeon

Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre (MFNERC) has a very interesting tool to teach Aboriginal students about their mythology — an inflatable planetarium.

Wilfred Buck, who hails from Opaskwayak Cree Nation but now works for (MFNERC), tours his inflatable planetarium around the province to different schools as part of the MFNERC . . . → Read More: Mythology in the stars

Scientists Unlock the Mystery Surrounding a Tale of Shaggy Dogs

Researchers from the University of York have produced the first clear evidence that textiles made by the indigenous population of the Pacific coast of North America contained dog hair.

In recent years, scientists have hotly debated whether textiles such as blankets and robes made by the skilful Coast Salish weavers before contact with Europeans were . . . → Read More: Scientists Unlock the Mystery Surrounding a Tale of Shaggy Dogs

Corn: Spiritual, Nutritional, Cultural, and in Danger

By Rebecca Jacobs

In New Mexico, Arizona and, recently, Belize, the work to revitalize, promote and sustain traditional methods of farming is being headed up by the Traditional Native American Farmer’s Association (TNAFA). By challenging governmental policy and offering workshops ranging in length from a few hours to a few days, education and action are . . . → Read More: Corn: Spiritual, Nutritional, Cultural, and in Danger

Why Did the Native American People Convert to a Foreign Religion?

By Tim Giago

It is written (Niehardt — Black Elk Speaks — 1932) that in the end, Black Elk converted to Catholicism and it is also well-known that Lakota Chief Red Cloud also converted to Catholicism and this brings us to ask: Why?

There have been many very traditional Lakota who never gave up their . . . → Read More: Why Did the Native American People Convert to a Foreign Religion?