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An Indigenous Call for Restoring the Sacred

The Fourth Way – For the Sake of the Human Family and Mother Earth

By Phil Lane

The spiritual foundation of the reunion of the Condor and the Eagle is based in the understanding of the fundamental oneness and unity of all life. All members of the Human Family are part of the ancient Sacred . . . → Read More: An Indigenous Call for Restoring the Sacred

Can Indigenous Beliefs Save the Contemporary World?

By Duane Champagne

Many people, including many indigenous people, think indigenous worldviews are an archaic part of the past and have no bearing on present-day life and issues. However, indigenous beliefs and ceremonies are continuously renewed, and persist among many tribal communities.

The persistence of indigenous understandings of the world is no accident. Indigenous knowledge, . . . → Read More: Can Indigenous Beliefs Save the Contemporary World?

The Jogah: Little People of the Iroquois

By Carolyn Emerick

Little People Across North America

Just as fae-folk and elfin creatures existed in the mythologies and folklore across Europe, similar creatures are a part of traditional folk custom all around the world. The North American continent is full of these stories, and they are just as unique and varied as the unique . . . → Read More: The Jogah: Little People of the Iroquois

New Map Reveals Aboriginal Knowledge

By Cherie McDonald

It’s hoped a world-first map recording Aboriginal knowledge will give Australian researchers and landholders a greater understanding of the environment.

The online map, curated by the Indigenous Biocultural Knowledge working group, aims to convert ancient oral knowledge about Australia into an accessible visual and literary format.

Griffith University anthropologist and ethnobiologist . . . → Read More: New Map Reveals Aboriginal Knowledge

Birds were the Heart of Extinct Beothuk Nation’s Religion: Study

By Randy Boswell

Archeologists have shed stunning new light on the extinct Beothuk nation of Newfoundland, revealing through a study of carved pendants unearthed from coastal burial sites that the ill-fated people — who had inhabited the region for at least 1,000 years before the devastating arrival of Europeans in the 15th century — placed . . . → Read More: Birds were the Heart of Extinct Beothuk Nation’s Religion: Study

Using Native American Sites for Worship

By Swain Wodening

[Snip] When the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes came to Great Britain they adopted many of the Celtic and pre-Celtic sites for their use. Barrows in particular were the focus of Anglo-Saxon holy sites. The temple site at Yeavering had an ancient barrow on its site. It had been adopted by the Celtic . . . → Read More: Using Native American Sites for Worship

Mermaid Tales From Native Tribes Abound

By ICTMN Staff

While the U.S. government and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) denies their existence, Native American tribes have been telling stories about mermaids from time immemorial.

From the Halfway People of the Mi’kmaq and the Lampeqinuwok of the Maliseet, to the story of Ne Hwas told by the the Passamaquoddy and . . . → Read More: Mermaid Tales From Native Tribes Abound

Female Powers and Places in Indian North America

By Max Dashu

[Snip] This isn’t exactly a book review, but I want to share some excellent information that the book provides about sacred place and story in North American Indian culture / religion. I’ll jump off from some of the information about American Indian women’s culture, female spirits and sacred sites, and medicine women, . . . → Read More: Female Powers and Places in Indian North America

Cultural Appropriation 101 for Dead Critter Artists

By Lupa

In recent years, wearable art with animal parts has become downright trendy, particularly, though not exclusively, among twenty-something hipsters and their “ironic” ilk. Feathered earrings are all the rage, fox tails are on everyone’s purse and belt loop, and “hipster headdresses” are showing up everywhere from college campuses to Coachella.

Unfortunately, some artists . . . → Read More: Cultural Appropriation 101 for Dead Critter Artists

The Unconquered, by Scott Wallace

Reviewed by Julia Heath

Sydney Possuelo is on a mission to find the last uncontacted tribes in the Amazon. A passionate and radical explorer and ethnographer, Possuelo has devoted his life to the preservation of indigenous and uncontacted Amazonian tribes, in addition to creating a team of likeminded activists called the Sertanistas. Possuelo is also . . . → Read More: The Unconquered, by Scott Wallace