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Rethinking Greek Religion, by Julia Kindt

Reviewed by Jorge J. Bravo III

Something is rotten in the study of Greek religion, or so the author aims to demonstrate in the present book, comprising six chapters bracketed by a short introduction and conclusion. As she states in her introduction, Kindt finds that the field has been dominated too much by polis religion, . . . → Read More: Rethinking Greek Religion, by Julia Kindt

The Crane Dance: Walking the Worlds

By Laura Perry

The Labyrinth may be the most well-known and widespread symbol to come out of ancient Minoan spirituality, but it is a static image. What if it were to come alive, to move, to dance? It did so on ancient Crete, and it still does today in Greek folk dances. And the motions . . . → Read More: The Crane Dance: Walking the Worlds

Embodying the Sacred

By River Devora

Each tradition and culture has its own understanding of the relationship between the physical body and the soul: some see the body as vehicle or vessel for the soul; some believe that the body is the physical manifestation of the soul and the source of our human magic; others believe the body . . . → Read More: Embodying the Sacred

Mournful Cries: Of Sorcerers & Spirits

By Jack Faust

The Sorcerer

The professional practice of Goetia primarily arises out of the late archaic age of Greece, gaining momentum around 500 – 400 BCE. The word means “lamenting,” or “wailing,” and describes the actions of the professional (known as the Goes, which is commonly glossed as “sorcerer”) who was employed to deal . . . → Read More: Mournful Cries: Of Sorcerers & Spirits

The Mythology of Eden, by Arthur George and Elena George

Reviewed by Medusa

What a fascinating book! Though it starts with and returns to an analysis of the second creation story in Genesis, The Mythology of Eden is about far more than that particular myth. It includes material on the backgrounds of the likely authors of the two Genesis creation stories and two other likely . . . → Read More: The Mythology of Eden, by Arthur George and Elena George

When Magic Becomes Mainstream (sort of): Tulpamancy

By Taylor Ellwood

[Snip] Tulpamancy is essentially the creation of an imaginary friend who shares your body with you. The practice reminds me a bit of otherkin, only in this case instead of the person claiming they are some type of non-human entity, they instead claim that they are creating a spirit being and hosting . . . → Read More: When Magic Becomes Mainstream (sort of): Tulpamancy

Nature’s Law and Our Relationship with Animals

Pagan Activist

[Snip] When talking about veganism with Pagans, one of the most common things that comes up is the relationship between predator and prey. . . .

In a discussion spurred by my comment on Michelle’s blog, a friend brought up rabbits. Rabbits breed really fast. A good number of rabbits from each generation . . . → Read More: Nature’s Law and Our Relationship with Animals

Liquor is Quicker- Spirits for the Spirit

By Lilith Dorsey

Alcohol is a normal offering for the spirits in the traditions of New Orleans Voodoo, Haitian Vodou, and Cuban La Regla Lucumi, also known as Santeria. Most people are familiar with the custom of offering rum as a blessing. Some altar setups definitely give the impression that the bar is always open. . . . → Read More: Liquor is Quicker- Spirits for the Spirit

Aphrodite’s Tortoise: The Veiled Woman of Ancient Greece

Reviewed by Jolene Dawe

[Snip] Women veiling. Pagan women veiling, in ancient Greece. Before monotheism became the big thing that it would later become. How wonderful! How delightful! No, I don’t need historical precedence to legitimize my veiling practice – it is something that my god asks me to do, and that is what living . . . → Read More: Aphrodite’s Tortoise: The Veiled Woman of Ancient Greece

The Rose in Myth and Legend

By Yewtree

The rose is the flower of Venus and the symbol of love in all its delicious variety. It is symbolically linked to Adonis, Aphrodite, Dionysus and Eros. Greek lovers gave roses as a courting gift to their eromenoi. “So must you beautiful boys arm yourselves with roses,” wrote Philostratus in the second century . . . → Read More: The Rose in Myth and Legend