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The Witches’ Pyramid

By Sable Aradia

The Witches’ Pyramid, or the Four Powers of the Magician, are a learning tool for students of the Craft. Each one of the powers is associated with a direction and an element, and each of these powers can be used as a way of viewing an approach to study. In order for . . . → Read More: The Witches’ Pyramid

Relationship-Based Heathenry: Ethics and Practices: Part Two

By John T Mainer

[Snip] Reciprocal gifting relationships are what Heathens seek to develop between each class of being they interact with. We build these relationships with the wights, being classified as all things having spirit includes all living people, animals, plants, the spirits of rivers, lakes and streams, of field, forest and home. The . . . → Read More: Relationship-Based Heathenry: Ethics and Practices: Part Two

Translating the Life of Merlin

By Callum Seymour

This essay analyses three of the most prominent translations of the Life of Merlin, in order to discern how the translator’s differing methods have resulted in subtle, yet important, changes in meaning. There have been three academic translations of the Life produced since 1925, and each of these translations has a distinct . . . → Read More: Translating the Life of Merlin

Shiva: Horned God of My Heart

By Jason Mankey

I have been a devotee of the god Shiva for nearly fifteen years. While my experiences with Him haven’t quite been as dramatic as those with Pan, Dionysus, or Cernunnos; he still holds a place in my heart. On an emotional level I feel as if I understand Shiva, on an intellectual . . . → Read More: Shiva: Horned God of My Heart

Survival of the Old Ways

By Dr. Karl E. H. Seigfried

Recently, while considering what to feature in a new post, I asked our Icelandic friend Kári Pálsson if he had written any articles on Icelandic traditions since his essay on “The Valley of the Gods.” He didn’t have a new piece, but he was kind enough to search for . . . → Read More: Survival of the Old Ways

News Flash: Fairy Tales Are All about Goddesses

By Jeri Studebaker

The idea that fairy tales were born out of Pagan religion is not a new one. Over the years scholars have often written about fairy tales being pre-Christian in origin. In fact, almost as soon as literate Europeans began to take an interest in fairy tales they admitted that these stories contained . . . → Read More: News Flash: Fairy Tales Are All about Goddesses

Odin and his Brothers: Common Threads of the Odinic Tradition

By Timothy J. Stephany

Abstract: Within the Poetic Edda Odin, Lodur (Loki) and Haenir are responsible for the creation of humanity in Nordic mythology. Odin can be seen in an early form as a god of the sky, Loki as a god of fire, and Haenir as a god of water. These gods of creation . . . → Read More: Odin and his Brothers: Common Threads of the Odinic Tradition

How to Do Interfaith: Basics For Pagan Beginners, Part 1

By Holli Emore

Someone asked me recently, however did you gain acceptance in South Carolina as a Pagan interfaith leader? Honestly, the story is not much of a mystery, but I’ve learned some things along the way which you may find useful.

1. Show up. Patrick McCollum was asked once what is the key to . . . → Read More: How to Do Interfaith: Basics For Pagan Beginners, Part 1

Religion in the Ancient Novel

By Froma I. Zeitlin

Abstract: This chapter of the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to the Ancient Novel, ed. Tim Whitmarsh, (2007) surveys the pervasive presence of religion and the sacred in the extant Greek and Roman novels and addresses the much discussed issues of its roles and functions, with an emphasis on the challenges the topic . . . → Read More: Religion in the Ancient Novel

Lughnasa – Festival of the Harvest

By Morgan Daimler

Lughnasa is also called Lughnasadh, Lunasa, Brón Trogain, Lunsadal, Laa Luanys, Calan Awst, and Gouel an Eost, and Alexei Kondratiev conjectures that the Celts of Gaul may have called this celebration Aedrinia (Kondratiev, 1998). The many names of the holiday show it’s pan-Celtic character, and demonstrate that it could be found . . . → Read More: Lughnasa – Festival of the Harvest