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The Rudiments of Neopagan Spiritual Practice

Meditation, Magic, and Invocation

By Donald H. Frew

It’s hard to know where to start addressing interfaith prayer from a European Indigenous / Neopagan context. As is often the case with Earth Religionists trying to write in an interfaith context, the conversation is filled with a multitude of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim voices. These voices . . . → Read More: The Rudiments of Neopagan Spiritual Practice

An Aromatic Wheel of the Year

By Sandra Kynes

While to some people the use of essential oils may seem more New Age or pop culture than Pagan, oils come from plants—and down through the ages Witches and Pagans have used plants for magic and ritual. Using essential oils is a way to hold tradition while extending our practices and giving . . . → Read More: An Aromatic Wheel of the Year

Druidry: The Art of Wild Wisdom

By John Beckett

The Ancient Druids

“The Druids may well have been the most prominent magico-religious specialists of some of the peoples of north-western Europe just over a couple of thousand years ago; and that is all we can say of them with reasonable certainty.”

This is the opening line of Blood and Mistletoe: the . . . → Read More: Druidry: The Art of Wild Wisdom

A Different Approach to Deity

Neopagan, Indigenous, and Earth-based Spiritual Practice

By Rachael Watcher

So much of what we think of as “prayer” comes out of a social experience that is informed by the Abrahamic religions, that we often forget about how our indigenous brothers and sisters approach their conversations with the Creator. For most of my younger life I . . . → Read More: A Different Approach to Deity

Polytheist Mysticism and the Dangers of Union

By P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

[Snip] One of the difficulties of discussing mysticism in a polytheist context is that the term “mysticism” has generally been understood through certain non-polytheist religious lenses, and has been defined rather exclusively through them. Even though many monotheistic religions don’t like, tolerate, or even think mysticism (under their monotheist definition) . . . → Read More: Polytheist Mysticism and the Dangers of Union

Lunulae / Crescents in Ancient Europe

By Max Dashu

[Snip] While putting together a new visual talk on Ancient Central Europe (a very disregarded corner of history) one of the themes that emerged was lunar crescents. Clay sculptures known as Mondhörner, “moon-horns” have been found in Switzerland, dating to about 1500-900 bce, from what i’ve been able to determine so far.

. . . → Read More: Lunulae / Crescents in Ancient Europe

Guinevere, the Superwoman of Contemporary Arthurian Fiction

By James Noble

In a perceptive article published in 1987, Elisabeth Brewer explores attempts by early twentieth-century dramatists and more recent novelists to transform Guinevere from a peripheral into a central figure in the Arthurian story. Although she does not see any of these efforts as improving upon the better known, though decidedly more misogynist, . . . → Read More: Guinevere, the Superwoman of Contemporary Arthurian Fiction

The Kothirat, Phoenician Birth and Bird Goddesses

By Thalia Took

The Kothirat, or Kathirat, are a group of Phoenician Marriage and Childbirth Goddesses, Who bring auspicious beginnings. Their usual number is seven, and the name means “the Wise Goddesses”, or “the Skillful Ones”. They preside over and help to plan weddings and the proper rituals of marriage, oversee conception and good sex, . . . → Read More: The Kothirat, Phoenician Birth and Bird Goddesses

Why Do People Keep Telling Me Paganism Requires Work?

By Patti Wigington

[Snip] Why do people keep telling me Paganism and Wicca are hard to learn? I’ve already read a bunch of books by [big name author] and I have candles, a pentacle and an altar. I’ve dedicated myself to the Goddess. What more do they want from me?

Answer:

I suppose if your . . . → Read More: Why Do People Keep Telling Me Paganism Requires Work?

The Nine Noble Virtues of Ásatrú

European Congress of Ethnic Religions

As with most other indigenous ethnic or folk religions, the ancestors of modern-day Scandinavians actually had no specific name for their religion. In those ancient times, when the whole community lived by one same religion, there was no need for a “name,” because there were simply no other religions known . . . → Read More: The Nine Noble Virtues of Ásatrú