Categories

Archives

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

High Holy Days Heck!

By P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

Judaism’s high holy days happened earlier this month, the “days of awe” between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. It’s coming to the last week of October now, and like many modern Pagans, late October is a busy time for me ritually. However, the most convenient weekend closest to October 31st . . . → Read More: High Holy Days Heck!

More signs of trade between ancient India and Rome discovered

The discovery of Roman pottery remains in Naduvirapattu, near Tambaram, last week has once again thrown light on the extensive trade between southern India and Rome more than 2,000 years ago. The latest findings seem to indicate that the Roman traders travelled inland and may have had temporary settlements there.

Naduvirapattu may have been . . . → Read More: More signs of trade between ancient India and Rome discovered

Russian Heat Wave Statistically Linked to Climate Change

By Brandon Keim

A new method of crunching climate data could make it possible to put a figure on climate change’s contribution to freak weather events, something that’s been difficult to do with empirical precision.

The debut subject: the Russian heat wave of July 2010, which killed 700 people and was unprecedented since record keeping . . . → Read More: Russian Heat Wave Statistically Linked to Climate Change

Goddess Stories: Húanaxu

By Pat Monaghan

[Snip] The mythology of the Yamana people of Tierra del Fuego, at the farthest southern extreme of South America, is known today only because of the region’s female storytellers. They recited the ancient tales to non-native missionaries and anthropologists, who recorded the information and who are credited with its authorship. Especially important . . . → Read More: Goddess Stories: Húanaxu

Reflections on ‘old guard’ Paganism

By Mike Nichols

‘Old Guard Paganism’. The phrase started out as a joke, but then caught on. This tells us something. It tells us there is a NEED for such a term. It also implies its own antithesis, ‘New Guard Paganism’. And it indicates that there is some difference between the two — a ‘difference . . . → Read More: Reflections on ‘old guard’ Paganism

A Cultural History of Sexuality, Volume 1: A Cultural History of Sexuality in the Classical World, by Mark Golden & Peter Toohey (eds.)

Reviewed by Marilyn B. Skinner

This is the initial volume of a six-part series surveying “changes in sexual attitudes and behavior throughout history” (vii) from antiquity to the present—though the series, as the separate titles indicate, is Eurocentric and deals almost exclusively with the Western world. Julie Peakman, the series editor, informs us that each . . . → Read More: A Cultural History of Sexuality, Volume 1: A Cultural History of Sexuality in the Classical World, by Mark Golden & Peter Toohey (eds.)

Indigenous Peoples Have Celebrated the Pumpkin for Centuries

By Dale Carson

I always wanted a pumpkin patch, so this year I planted one far out in the fields. Weeds quickly engulfed the orange fruit and its vines. Somehow, six sweet pumpkins survived.

Although it is thought that the sunset-colored gourd likely originated in Mexico and Central America, fragments of pumpkin stems, seeds and . . . → Read More: Indigenous Peoples Have Celebrated the Pumpkin for Centuries

Anat: Warrior Virgin of the Ancient Levant

By Johanna H. Stuckey

Young and impetuous Anat was one of the great goddesses of the ancient Levant, the area now occupied by Israel, Transjordan, and Syria. In mythic poems from the ancient city of Ugarit on the coast of Syria, she had a very active role, but the other important source for the polytheistic . . . → Read More: Anat: Warrior Virgin of the Ancient Levant

City of Ravens, by Boria Sax

Reviewed by BadWitch

[Snip] London is also the City of Ravens according to a new book of that name.

Author Boria Sax explains that although the etymology of the word London isn’t entirely clear, it could be a Roman version of the Celtic name “Lugdunum”, which translates as “the town of the god Lugh” or . . . → Read More: City of Ravens, by Boria Sax

Paganism: No longer a ‘Religion of Clergy’

By Erebos

[Snip] The thing that seems to hold contemporary Paganism back is the very same thing which has always held it back, except that it isn’t even real as in many ways the growth of Paganism as a “religion” has and is being held back by a self-fulfilling prophecy, a “communal myth”.

This “communal . . . → Read More: Paganism: No longer a ‘Religion of Clergy’