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The More High-tech Schools Become, the More They Need Nature

By Richard Louv

I once met an instructor who trains young people to become the pilots of cruise ships. He described the two kinds of students he encounters. One kind grew up mainly indoors, spending hours playing video games and working on computers. These students are quick to learn the ship’s electronics, a useful talent, the instructor explained. The other kind of student grew up spending a lot of time outdoors, often in nature. They, too, have a talent. “They actually know where the ship is.”

He wasn’t being cute. Recent studies of the human senses back that statement up. “We need people who have both ways of knowing the world,” he added. In “The Nature Principle,” I tell that story to describe what I call the “hybrid mind.” I make the case that one goal of modern education should be to encourage such flexible thinking. Is education moving in that direction? Some schools are, but too many are putting all their eggs on one computer chip.

“Almost as an article of religious faith, school districts are flooding students with computers and other Internet-connected gadgets. Yet, as the New York Times reported on Sept. 3, 2011, “to many education experts, something is not adding up.” Schools are spending billions on technology “even as they cut budgets and lay off teachers, with little proof that this approach is improving basic learning.”

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