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Marlborough mound mystery solved – after 4,400 years

Hill in Wiltshire school grounds nicknamed Silbury’s little sister revealed as important neolithic monument

By Maev Kennedy

For generations, it has been scrambled up with pride by students at Marlborough College. But the mysterious, pudding-shaped mound in the grounds of the Wiltshire public school now looks set to gain far wider acclaim as scientists have . . . → Read More: Marlborough mound mystery solved – after 4,400 years

The Little Book of Odes and Invocations, by Auntie Matter

Reviewed by Lupa

One of the things I love about reviewing self-published works is that while a good number of them are in sore need of editing, there are those wonderfully independent gems that are both well-written, and defy conventional publishing rules. A ten-page book of nothing but sacred poetry may not sound all that . . . → Read More: The Little Book of Odes and Invocations, by Auntie Matter

5 Senses & the Gaelic Well of Wisdom

By Heather Awen

In the Celtic Lore (which we don’t call Lore, but why not? Heathens do.), there is the story of a well with five streams flowing from it. (There are also salmon eating the nuts from hazel trees, other Gaelic symbols of wisdom.) The human male who sees it asks what it means . . . → Read More: 5 Senses & the Gaelic Well of Wisdom

Folklore of the Stoat (Easóg)

By SilentOwl

The Irish name Easóg refers to its eel like shape (eas is the Irish for eel) and when it runs its body undulates.

Rarely encountered in the flesh, but common in country tales, stoat packs have long hunted the borderland between folklore and natural history. It was once believed that the stoat was . . . → Read More: Folklore of the Stoat (Easóg)

Worst ever carbon emissions leave climate on the brink

By Fiona Harvey

Greenhouse gas emissions increased by a record amount last year, to the highest carbon output in history, putting hopes of holding global warming to safe levels all but out of reach, according to unpublished estimates from the International Energy Agency.

The shock rise means the goal of preventing a temperature rise of . . . → Read More: Worst ever carbon emissions leave climate on the brink

The Witches of Antrim

By Declan Cashin

In March 1711, eight women appeared in court in Carrickfergus, Co Antrim, as part of a sensational trial that found them guilty. They were put in the stocks for the public to rain stones and rotten fruit upon them, before being jailed for a year.

Their crime? The demonic possession . . . → Read More: The Witches of Antrim

Healing Misanthropic Thinking to Heal Earth

By Heather Awen

One of the challenges for neopagans and eco-activists alike is the sheer amount of us who are misanthropic. I admit to being pretty human-hating a lot of my life, even today. It is the main reason I think neopaganism cannot have real “community.” Most neopagans were the bullied kid in the Cure . . . → Read More: Healing Misanthropic Thinking to Heal Earth

The Need for Regular Practice

By Hrafn

One of the constant challenges in today’s world is finding the time and the space to engage in a regular practice. Yet there is very little–for our spiritual or magical development–that is more critical than finding that time and space.

For some people, there priorities in Paganism are primarily social. They like to . . . → Read More: The Need for Regular Practice

Folklore of the Bear (Mathúin)

By SilentOwl

Bear folklore is widespread, especially in the far northern hemisphere. It is not surprising that this awesome beast was one of the first animals to be revered by our ancestors. From as far back as the Palaeolithic (around 50,000 years ago) there is evidence of a bear cult in which the bear . . . → Read More: Folklore of the Bear (Mathúin)

Canada has ‘more to lose than it realizes’: global warming report on Arctic

By Margaret Munro

Canada’s fabled Northwest Passage will not open up to shipping anytime soon, according to a study that warns global warming is a double-edged sword for northern transportation.

“And Canada is going to be feeling the harsh edge of the sword more strongly than other Arctic states,” says Scott Stephenson, lead author of . . . → Read More: Canada has ‘more to lose than it realizes’: global warming report on Arctic