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Blessings

By Porphyry

A Unitarian Universalist minister I know recently said that one of the purposes of religious practice is to empower us so that we may go out and bless the world . That idea of empowerment as a vehicle through which we both are blessed and bless the world intrigues me. How do . . . → Read More: Blessings

Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner, by Krasskova and Kaldera

Reviewed by Hrafn

Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit by Galina Krasskova and Raven Kaldera is a difficult book to review. One the one hand, the book has excellent content and the author’s aims in writing the book were laudable: we really do . . . → Read More: Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner, by Krasskova and Kaldera

A Priestess of the Horned God

By Juniper

I was young and brash, too bold for my own good. I had grown tired of the typical introductory level of Paganism our spiritual movement is inundated with. I was bored. I hungered for something more, something deeper, some mystical spiritual experience, something mind-blowing. Be careful what you ask for.

I coated . . . → Read More: A Priestess of the Horned God

Forget Chocolate: Saffron and Ginseng Spice Up Sex Life

Researchers examine libido legends: Some natural aphrodisiacs debunked, others supported by study

It can be hard separating fact from fiction when searching for that special something to liberate the libido.

Researchers from the University of Guelph in southern Ontario have published a scientific review on the merits of various substances purported over the . . . → Read More: Forget Chocolate: Saffron and Ginseng Spice Up Sex Life

Goddesses for Every Day, by Julie Loar

Reviewed by Rebecca

“Goddesses for Every Day: Exploring the Wisdom & Power of the Divine Feminine Around the World” features a selection of 366 goddesses that cover every religious and spiritual tradition you can imagine. Loar arranged the book to be a journey you take throughout the course of a year, and opted to . . . → Read More: Goddesses for Every Day, by Julie Loar

Writing Coven Bylaws

By Patti Wigington

Whenever you have a group of people getting together for a common purpose, it’s always a good idea to have some sort of guidelines on how those people will be interacting with one another. Whether it’s a Wiccan coven, a stamp collectors’ club or a PTA, bylaws provide a sense of . . . → Read More: Writing Coven Bylaws

Who the Heck are the Faeries?

By Heather Awen

First off, the lore. The big Celtic Reconstructionist book for fairy info is The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries. This book has two points of view in it – the rural Irish and the urban Anglo-Irish. The rural Irish know to be scared of Fairies. They have lots of stories of . . . → Read More: Who the Heck are the Faeries?

Why feminists are less religious

In our survey of British feminists, more than half said they were either atheist or had no religion. Here’s why that might be.

By Kristin Aune

Feminism, said evangelist and Republican broadcaster Pat Robertson in 1992, “is a socialist, anti-family, political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy . . . → Read More: Why feminists are less religious

A Journey to the Heart of The Russian Occult

By Marc Bennetts

Everyone knows about Grigory Rasputin, the mysterious monk whose malign influence over Tsar Nicholas II led indirectly to the Bolshevik Revolution. But the wild-eyed former peasant was not only – as Boney M put it -“Russia’s greatest love machine,” he was also rumoured to have links to the Khlysty sect, a bunch . . . → Read More: A Journey to the Heart of The Russian Occult

How Old is the Universe?, by David A. Weintraub

Reviewed by Peter Rogerson

There is a consensus among astronomers that the answer to the question posed by the title of this book is about 13.7 billion years. Professor Weintraub tells us how this figure was arrived at, beginning with Aristotle, who dealt with the problem by asserting that the universe had always existed and . . . → Read More: How Old is the Universe?, by David A. Weintraub