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Why Sometimes I Don’t Want to Be Associated with Paganism

By A.E. Goddard

There are moments where I throw my hands up in the air because I’m so disgusted with the Neo-Pagan Movement. Much of what I’ve observed in this past year are things I observed (and subsequently felt disgusted by) occurred in Christianity.

It’s becoming a clique. I’m seeing this trend where unless you’re . . . → Read More: Why Sometimes I Don’t Want to Be Associated with Paganism

Religion From Nature, Not Archaeology

By Starhawk

Goddess religion is not based on belief, in history, in archaeology, in any Great Goddess past or present. Our spirituality is based on experience, on a direct relationship with the cycles of birth, growth, death and regeneration in nature and in human lives. We see the complex interwoven web of life as . . . → Read More: Religion From Nature, Not Archaeology

Rite of the Assumption of Godhead

By Frater Barrabbas

As previously promised, I have produced an article that explains the basic structures for Godhead assumption as used in the Order of the Gnostic Star. Since Godhead assumption is one of my most important rituals, and is considered one of the core disciplines in the Order, I thought that it would be . . . → Read More: Rite of the Assumption of Godhead

A Suitable Word for Sacrifice

By Swain Wodening

Theodsmen have long held that the word blót only refers to a blood sacrifice. Usage of the word in Old English would seem to support this (I am not familiar enough with Old Norse to say if this is also true of it, but from what I have seen it is). Therefore, . . . → Read More: A Suitable Word for Sacrifice

Viking Serpents

By Richard Svensson

Sweden has its fair share of weird folkloric fauna. When studying the maps and literary works of 16th-century Swedish bishop Olaus Magnus, one might think that Scandinavia was completely monster-infested. Magnus’s seminal work Historia de Gentibus Septentrionalibus (History of the Northern People), printed in Rome in 1555, contains detailed, but wildly imaginative, . . . → Read More: Viking Serpents

Oceanic warming causing plankton decrease

The amount of phytoplankton – tiny marine plants – in the top layers of the oceans has declined markedly over the last century, research suggests.

Writing in the journal Nature, scientists say the decline appears to be linked to rising water temperatures.

They made their finding by looking at records of the transparency of sea . . . → Read More: Oceanic warming causing plankton decrease

Further Considerations on Godhead Assumption

By Frater Barrabbas

I have been in communication with a number of individuals who have presented to me their various opinions about my previous article on this subject. I believe that I have presented the truth about these practices, since many have agreed with what I have said. Others in the ceremonial magickal discipline have . . . → Read More: Further Considerations on Godhead Assumption

Bitey of Blackenwood

This Satyr is a nasty piece of work 🙂

Enjoy the animation and there’s a series of animations if you enjoy this one (see link below)

Read the original article at: Bitey of Brackenwood

Anglo-Saxon Birth Rituals

By Swain Wodening

Not much information survives on birth rituals. Going by Germanic folklore, the father was definitely expected to be present at the birth of a child, and to provide the mother moral support and help ease the pain during the birth its self. This is seen especially in the Scandinavian countries. An old . . . → Read More: Anglo-Saxon Birth Rituals

La religion des femmes en Grèce ancienne: mythes, cultes et société

Reviewed by Marietta Horster

The papers in this volume are based on a colloquium organised in Cork in honour of (more or less) 20 years since the publication of Pierre Brulé’s “La fille d’Athènes. La religion des filles à Athènes à l’époque classique. Mythes, cultes et société” (Paris 1987). One of the very interesting and . . . → Read More: La religion des femmes en Grèce ancienne: mythes, cultes et société