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Thoughts About Lammas

Lammas, or Lughnasad, has always been one of my favorite Sabbats. It is celebrated from July 31 to August 2, generally, and we are fortunate this year that all the dates are on the weekend. Lammas is the first and biggest of the harvest Sabbats, for it is at this time that in the temperate . . . → Read More: Thoughts About Lammas

Paganism is the New Christianity

There is a strange phenomenon occuring on YouTube (and therefore in real life). Pagans, which is to say mostly Wiccans (American “Wiccans”), are up in arms over some people who want to “mix Pantheons”; in particular, adding mystical Christianity into the mix.

Most of the people who are pissed off at the idea of “the . . . → Read More: Paganism is the New Christianity

Pagan festival etiquette: An aging Pagan writer faces reality

Pagan Festival etiquette is being taken to a new level as some of our larger and first out Pagan Festivals age (for the most part) gracefully into their 20s and 30s. Some once sexy bonfire dancers have become 50-ish and are approaching–OK–have already reached–“crone-dom” and “wise old man” status. No offense to anyone here, I . . . → Read More: Pagan festival etiquette: An aging Pagan writer faces reality

Who You Calling a Witch?

Pagans struggle to come out of the broom closet

It’s a warm autumn evening, and the Coven of Unitarian Universalist Pagans are holding a full-moon ritual in the social hall at the Unitarian Church in Charleston. This occasion was one of the 13 full-moon rituals in the Pagan Wheel of the Year calendar celebrating . . . → Read More: Who You Calling a Witch?

Valued Ideals and Ideal Values: Sacredness

People usually consider walking on water or in thin air a miracle. But I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the . . . → Read More: Valued Ideals and Ideal Values: Sacredness

Foreign Traditional Doctors Fake?

“Get back your lover in three days,” says a pamphlet by a foreign “traditional doctor” practising in Botswana. The doctor claims that he can fix marriage problems and divorce cases as well as bring back lost lovers.

No problem is too big for these foreign traditional medicine men. The doctor further claims that he can . . . → Read More: Foreign Traditional Doctors Fake?

Pagan Values (by Starhawk)

“The greatest ethical problem at the moment, I think, for those of us who believe the earth is sacred is how to respond to climate change, to the immense potential loss of life and biodiversity it represents, to the personal and social challenges it poses. How do we both live with personal integrity and . . . → Read More: Pagan Values (by Starhawk)

Wookey Hill auditions to start: now they need a zombie

Wookey Hole said it has since sent out 2,319 applications and have received 23 letters of complaint from church or religious groups.

Auditions for the role are being held on Tuesday…

Meanwhile in London auditions are being held for a £30,000-a-year job performing the role of a zombie at the London Bridge Experience and London . . . → Read More: Wookey Hill auditions to start: now they need a zombie

The Faery Teachings, by Orion Foxwood

I can definitely report that “The Faery Teachings” has been a rich and enjoyable read. Although touted as an “introduction” to Faery Seership, it does not read or provide as an introductory book. The amount of knowledge and experience really shines through. The overview of Faery Seership is broad but very compelling, giving the reader . . . → Read More: The Faery Teachings, by Orion Foxwood

Melee at bullfight renews animal cruelty debate

It was supposed to be a “bloodless bullfight,” a dangerous dance between a pirouetting matador and a enraged bull that would not end in death. But this time-honored Portuguese tradition capping a religious festival was anything but bloodless.

As the matador raised a short festooned spear to stick to the bull’s neck, an animal welfare . . . → Read More: Melee at bullfight renews animal cruelty debate