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Question of the Day: How to Deal With The Ignorant

My teaching schedule, now compounded by a theatre schedule, has been keeping me away from the blog these past couple of weeks, and that may well be the case until May or June. However, I definitely wanted to address an emailed question from a Christian asking for suggestions on how to deal with a friend . . . → Read More: Question of the Day: How to Deal With The Ignorant

Nature-based faiths celebrate arrival of spring

By DANA MASSING

Rich Konkol Jr. lay on the sanctuary floor, covered by a black cloak, practicing his religion. He snored. His loud nasal grunts were exaggerated, as befitted someone playing the role of a gatekeeper put to sleep by a Holly King who didn’t want to make way for the Oak King’s new season.

. . . → Read More: Nature-based faiths celebrate arrival of spring

Warlock: A Cauldron of Controversy

Someone who posted on my blog today reminded me of a word, a title that I personally adore but still has clichés holding a death grip to it. I use the word in my books, Warlock that is, and it isn’t used to describe the villain. However, in the world of paganism, neo-paganism, etc, etc, . . . → Read More: Warlock: A Cauldron of Controversy

Blathering Claptrap! “Examiner” Has No Clue

by Catherine Beyer

Examiner.com claims that their “Examiners are credible, passionate, knowledgeable writers.” Jake Jones, “Evangelical Examiner,” might even be knowledgeable in his area. What he clearly is not knowledgeable in is the topic of this article on the dangers of the occult.

Why do I even bother sharing this nonsense? Because it’s a great . . . → Read More: Blathering Claptrap! “Examiner” Has No Clue

Lack of Myth

One of the sad things about Anglo-Saxon Heathenry is the lack of myths about the Gods and Goddesses. For that we are reliant upon the Norse myths as no Anglo-Saxon versions of the Edda survived. It is therefore with much glee when we find something that may be a reference to a myth in an . . . → Read More: Lack of Myth

Delegation visits Wirral to explore Viking past

A PIONEERING link has been established between former Viking parliament sites in Wirral and Norway. Tingvoll and Thingwall are among a handful of similarly-named towns or villages in Europe thought to have had Viking settlements.

As the name means “assembly field”, experts believe these were once seats of Viking power. Others include Tingvellir in Iceland . . . → Read More: Delegation visits Wirral to explore Viking past

The Gods of the Sacrifice

In every full rite of Sacrifice the Druid seeks the aid of two of the Great Gods. Every rite opens and closes with an offering to the Earth Mother. The Mother of All is the most ancient, a Primal Power of the cosmos itself. For mortals the Goddess is very near and real – . . . → Read More: The Gods of the Sacrifice

How Science Fiction Found Religion

by Benjamin A. Plotinsky

There is a young man, different from other young men. Ancient prophecies foretell his coming, and he performs miraculous feats. Eventually, confronted by his enemies, he must sacrifice his own life—an act that saves mankind from calamity—but in a mystery as great as that of his origin, he is reborn, to . . . → Read More: How Science Fiction Found Religion

Hypatia Of Alexandria: The Passage From Philosophy To Religion

Hypatia (370-415 CE, pronounced `ip-uh-TEE-ya’) was the daughter of Theon, the last professor of the Alexandrian University (associated closely with the famous Library of Alexandria). Theon was a brilliant mathematician who closely copied Euclid’s Elements and the works of Ptolemy and, in the language of our day, home-schooled his daughter in mathematics and philosophy. Hypatia . . . → Read More: Hypatia Of Alexandria: The Passage From Philosophy To Religion

Witches’ Maze to Honour Witch-Hunt Victims

It is the intriguing tale of the lord, the witches and the warlocks. A Scottish aristocrat is creating a memorial to the men and women who were put to death on the orders of his 17th-century predecessor.

Lord Moncrieff is building a 100ft maze in the grounds of his ancestral home at Tullibole Castle, near . . . → Read More: Witches’ Maze to Honour Witch-Hunt Victims