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The Incomplete and Utter History of Pagan Opera Part III: Arias in Albion

It’s difficult to associate the world of British classical music with the neo-pagan hedonism of the Glastonbury Festival. However, over the last hundred years or so, there has been a seam of paganism running through British classical music, and every now and again it broke the surface. Even our most revered composer, the stately . . . → Read More: The Incomplete and Utter History of Pagan Opera Part III: Arias in Albion

Modern Druidism

by Trish Deneen

What comes to mind when you hear the word Druid? White-robed, sickle-carrying, bearded men or tree-hugging hippy types? Modern Druidism is as diverse as the many other Neo-Pagan paths and includes men and women from around the world from various backgrounds.

Below is an introduction to some of the largest Druid organizations . . . → Read More: Modern Druidism

Traditional Witchcraft: a Cornish Book of Ways

Occasionally a book is published which really catches my eye, a book that is unique and written with authority and an understanding of the subject matter. A book where something can be read within its pages that is different and original, that hasn’t been constantly regurgitated, re-written or plagiarised! Traditional Witchcraft, a Cornish Book of . . . → Read More: Traditional Witchcraft: a Cornish Book of Ways

(Pagan) News of Note

by Jason Pitzl-Waters

My semi-regular round-up of articles, essays, and opinions of note for discerning Pagans and Heathens. SF Weekly interviews Sister Edith Myflesh from the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and discusses the group’s popularity, charity work, religious diversity, and what real-live nuns think of them. More subtle hints that as religion becomes ever-more female . . . → Read More: (Pagan) News of Note

Claimed by the Gods

When someone gets claimed by the Gods to be in Their service, it can be a troubling thing. We live in a host culture that is essentially post-religious, and the dominant paradigm does not allow for experiences such as talking and other activities with the Gods, and having Them intervene/interfere directly in one’s life. Even . . . → Read More: Claimed by the Gods

Extreme Motherhood

By Kathryn Joyce

Understanding Quiverfull, the antifeminist, conservative Christian movement… But there’s one big omission from the on-screen portrayal of many of these families: their motivation. Though the Duggars do describe themselves as conservative Christians, in reality, they follow a belief system that goes far beyond “Cheaper by the Dozen” high jinks. It is a . . . → Read More: Extreme Motherhood

Calling Upon Tremendous Humanity of the Tribal Heart

The barbarian warrior drew his great ferocity and strength from his tremendous humanity, not his inhumanity. How easily we idealize orcs, and project goblins onto men! (How tempting for men to become goblins.) Entranced by a “grim” reality, we imagine inhuman warriors so macho and hard they’ve lost the most resilient and vulnerable sides of . . . → Read More: Calling Upon Tremendous Humanity of the Tribal Heart

Easter: what does it mean?

by Sarah Wilson

In the UK Christianity has come to dominate our understanding of Easter. However, Easter is historically diverse in its celebrations and origins, stemming from ancient cultures that predate Jesus and Christianity. The celebration of Jesus’ crucifixion and subsequent resurrection is the most important date in the Christian calendar. The date of Easter . . . → Read More: Easter: what does it mean?

Easter: what does it mean?

by Sarah Wilson

In the UK Christianity has come to dominate our understanding of Easter. However, Easter is historically diverse in its celebrations and origins, stemming from ancient cultures that predate Jesus and Christianity. The celebration of Jesus’ crucifixion and subsequent resurrection is the most important date in the Christian calendar. The date of Easter . . . → Read More: Easter: what does it mean?

The Incomplete and Utter History of Pagan Opera, Part II

By 1837, Bellini had put northern European Paganism on the stage and given the opera world a Moon Goddess and a sassy High Priestess. One of his biggest fans was the new conductor at the Riga theatre, who just about manage to put on a performance of Norma before he had to flee to Russia . . . → Read More: The Incomplete and Utter History of Pagan Opera, Part II