News of the Past

News Catagories

Long ago News

Sponsored Links

Darwinian Ethics

by Gus diZerega

Pagans stand in an interesting relationship to Christians and Secularists. Because we focus on the Sacred as it manifests in the world, we do not have the problems with science and knowledge of the world that the Christian Church has had since its inception. On the other hand, we agree with our . . . → Read More: Darwinian Ethics

Christian salt seller hopes to shake up market

You’ve heard of kosher salt? Now there’s a Christian variety.

Retired barber Joe Godlewski says that when television chefs recommended kosher salt in recipes, he wondered, “What the heck’s the matter with Christian salt?”

By next week, his trademarked Blessed Christians Salt will be available from seasonings manufacturer Ingredients Corporation of America. It’s sea salt . . . → Read More: Christian salt seller hopes to shake up market

Air Force Investigating Commander’s Promotion of Religious Website Video

Today’s New York Times reports that the Air Force has begun an investigation into whether its policy on religious neutrality was breached when a commander sent an e-mail to thousands of personnel in her 501st Combat Support Wing in Europe urging them to view an inspirational video on Catholic website. The video promoted by Col. . . . → Read More: Air Force Investigating Commander’s Promotion of Religious Website Video

Reconstructionism: That was then, this is now?

Most of the arguments that I hear against the Reconstructionist methodology seem to assume either that Recon worship is all head and no heart, or (sometimes “and”) that Recons want to recreate the ancient cultural context entirely. Neither assumption, in my experience, is correct. In what follows I will speak entirely of Hellenismos, since . . . → Read More: Reconstructionism: That was then, this is now?

What Happened to Our Traditional Roots?

by Jon “Athrawon” Edens

What in the world are new Wiccans and Pagans learning?

Why are newbies teaching newbies? and where are the ones with even a little bit of experience to help guide the new seekers? While these questions may appear confrontational to confusing, they are something that we in the Wiccan/Witch/Pagan community need . . . → Read More: What Happened to Our Traditional Roots?

Swastikas on Scottish Gravestones

To date there has been no publication of any substance or significance on this topic. Very little is known about these examples of the Swastika in Scotland because they often appear in unexpected places, off the beaten track and the relevant artefacts are sometimes only found in museums.

In this article on the Swastika in . . . → Read More: Swastikas on Scottish Gravestones

Leprechauns!

The name leprechaun may have derived from the Irish leath bhrogan (shoemaker), although its origins may lie in luacharma’n (Irish for pygmy). These apparently aged, diminutive men are frequently to be found in an intoxicated state, caused by home-brew poteen. However they never become so drunk that the hand which holds the hammer becomes . . . → Read More: Leprechauns!

Ken Wilber, the Occult, and Maps

Ken Wilber has a lot of very interesting things to say, and his Intergral Philosophy has a great deal to challenge and enliven the practice of magickal practitioners of all stripes. That is, if they can get past his attitudes toward occultists and Neopagans. For instance, what how is a Witch supposed to respond to . . . → Read More: Ken Wilber, the Occult, and Maps

Another Evil Crowley Film?

by Jason Pitzl-Waters

After the critical panning that the Aleister Crowley-centric horror film “Chemical Wedding” (aka “Crowley”) recieved last year, you’d think that filmmakers would be hesitant to drink from that same well again. Well, you’d be wrong. LAShTAL tips us off that another director is looking to place Crowley back in the horror-film limelite.

. . . → Read More: Another Evil Crowley Film?

Written in Wine: A Devotional Anthology for Dionysos

Dionysos is one of those deities that I’m surprised I haven’t had more direct interaction with. I think, perhaps, it’s because I’m a modern-day teetotaler (with the rare exception of small amounts for ritual use), and like so many people I’ve primarily associated Dionysus with drinking and wine. However, this particular collection has given me . . . → Read More: Written in Wine: A Devotional Anthology for Dionysos