News of the Past

News Catagories

Long ago News

Sponsored Links

Pagans can feel Pride at Headwaters Forest Celebration

by Gus diZerega

While we are a small portion of America’s population, on occasion we can be mighty. Ten years ago the Headwaters Forest in northern California was saved from the rape and pillage methods of logging by Texas financiers who took over a responsibly managed Pacific Lumber company to liquidate its assets and make . . . → Read More: Pagans can feel Pride at Headwaters Forest Celebration

Thoughts on Urban Paganism and Urban Spirit Work

One of the challenging things about my path is that it is entirely urban. This doesn’t mean that I create new, urban deities and follow those but rather than my practice draws me to the city and binds me to the city in a way that some people are bound to the countryside.

I don’t . . . → Read More: Thoughts on Urban Paganism and Urban Spirit Work

Ethical Traditions: The Rede and the Threefold Law

by Brandon

Even in a community as fiercely independent as contemporary Paganism, guides to behavior exist and flourish. These ethics are not mandatorily imposed, nor are they accepted by all, but they do exert strong influence. And for many, they help us in times of difficult decisions. Today I’d like to discuss two of the . . . → Read More: Ethical Traditions: The Rede and the Threefold Law

Thorn and Pagan Magazine Publishing

I like magazines. I have worked for three, owned one (still going), and sold freelance articles to a bunch of others. I taught university classes in magazine-writing and production.

So when Vol. 1, No. 1 of Thorn, subtitled Paganism in the Silicon Age, hit my mailbox, I was eager to read it.

Having made various . . . → Read More: Thorn and Pagan Magazine Publishing

A Little Taste of Miracle

by Clea Danaan

Even as an infant, I loved dirt. Plopped in a patch of soil, dressed only in a cloth diaper and a sunhat, I would clench this best of toys in my fat little fist, shake it up and down, and grin. My parents dreamed of homesteading, so there was plenty of dirt . . . → Read More: A Little Taste of Miracle

Ishtar

This week by luck of the draw we get Ishtar, the Babylonian (Semitic) Goddess of love and war. She is quite similar to the Sumerian Inanna, and many of the same stories are told of both Ishtar and Inanna, including the Underworld journey I related in the Inanna Goddess of the Week entry linked above. . . . → Read More: Ishtar

Life Magazine article on Witches from 1964

by Jason Pitzl-Waters

A kind soul has brought to my attention a download of a 1964 Life Magazine article about modern Witches and Pagans. Providing most of the text for the piece is Eleanor Ray Bone, “Matriarch of British Witchcraft”, and one of Gerald Gardner’s High Priestesses. This being Life Magazine, it also has several . . . → Read More: Life Magazine article on Witches from 1964

Getting Money and Finding a Honey

An Exploration of Roman Male and Female Values in The Golden Ass

What can a novel entitled The Golden Ass possibly tell us about Roman society? Can reading about a woman who supposedly slits a man’s windpipe to pull out his heart really enlighten us on the values possessed by the greater female population? . . . → Read More: Getting Money and Finding a Honey

Skeleton of village ‘witch’ to be re-buried

by Keyan Milanian

The medieval remains of a teenage girl who may have been suspected of witchcraft are to be given a Christian burial and funeral.

The skeleton, found by Faversham-based archaeologist Dr Paul Wilkinson, is thought to be from the 14th or 15th century. It was found in unconsecrated ground under a holly tree, . . . → Read More: Skeleton of village ‘witch’ to be re-buried

Church of the Old Mermaids, by Kim Antieau

The Church of the Old Mermaids is “not a real church…” protagonist Myla Alverez tells us as the novel opens. It’s what she calls her space in an outdoor market in Arizona where she puts her table, chair and wares on Saturdays. She calls it the Church of the Old Mermaids because “her mother . . . → Read More: Church of the Old Mermaids, by Kim Antieau