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Teacher didn’t violate policy in killing rabbits

A Plant City High School teacher did not violate district policies or procedures last month when she used a shovel to euthanize two dying baby rabbits, school district investigators said.

The preliminary findings after Jane Bender, an agricultural science teacher, met with the district’s Office of Professional Standards. Bender faced possible disciplinary action for dismembering . . . → Read More: Teacher didn’t violate policy in killing rabbits

He has a vision, but does he have the Wright stuff?

By Kevin Maney

In a business world trapped in cycles of short-term thinking, Paul Moller is at once a freak and an object of awe. He is what many hotshot entrepreneurs wish they could be: a genius whose project could change life as fundamentally as the first car.

Yet Moller’s record would leave any . . . → Read More: He has a vision, but does he have the Wright stuff?

The book, the film … and the teachers

By Tim Burt

Cary Granat has just returned from the Sahara, but his mind is fixed firmly in winter. The chief executive and co-founder of Walden Media, the Hollywood filmmaker, was in North Africa to check progress on a desert epic. But his journey was interrupted by constant calls about a far bigger project – . . . → Read More: The book, the film … and the teachers

Celebrating birthdays is an ancient tradition

Birthday parties go all the way back to ancient Egypt, where the pharaohs ordered businesses to close on their birthdays and gave huge feasts for everyone in the royal household, including the servants. The servants still had to clean up the place afterward, though.

It was reported that Cleopatra threw a birthday bash for . . . → Read More: Celebrating birthdays is an ancient tradition

Will Disney’s Hex Mark the Spot?

By Linton Weeks

When it comes to exporting popular American kidculture to other parts of the planet, the Walt Disney Co. is the out-and-out, hands-down, no-doubt-about-it world champ. Now Disney is turning the tables and importing a fad.

You heard right. Batten down the hatches and lock up your young ones. It’s a book! . . . → Read More: Will Disney’s Hex Mark the Spot?

Policy turns into a matter of faith

By Stephen Bates

Religious groups should be consulted as a matter of course over a wide range of government policies and local authority initiatives, with civil servants receiving faith awareness training to inform their work, the Home Office said yesterday.

The official document, Working Together: Cooperation between Government and Faith Communities, says officials should consult . . . → Read More: Policy turns into a matter of faith

Convention passes gay-marriage ban

By David Kibbe

The state Legislature yesterday narrowly approved a constitutional amendment that bans gay marriage and simultaneously creates civil unions for same-sex couples, forging a hard-won compromise that pleased neither side of the debate.

If the Legislature approves the identical constitutional amendment in the 2005-06 legislative session, it will be put to voters in . . . → Read More: Convention passes gay-marriage ban

Hula: The philosophical footwork that ‘is life’

By Kate Santich

Before the chanting can begin, before the praying and the dancing and the gourd-drumming, Sue Kerzisnik must rearrange her living room furniture. She wouldn’t want a hula dancer tripping over the ottoman and doing a face plant into the fireplace.

Her 1940s Windermere cottage makes for a crowded hula school, but the . . . → Read More: Hula: The philosophical footwork that ‘is life’

Sea ‘dead zones’ threaten fish

By Alex Kirby

Sea areas starved of oxygen will soon damage fish stocks even more than unsustainable catches, the United Nations believes. The UN Environment Programme says excessive nutrients, mainly nitrogen from human activities, are causing these “dead zones” by stimulating huge growths of algae.

Since the 1960s the number of oxygen-starved areas has . . . → Read More: Sea ‘dead zones’ threaten fish

Man intends to construct his own kind of Stonehenge

By KIM CRAWFORD

Some may find it odd that a 57-year-old man goes out into his yard to play with blocks. But then, the blocks that Wallace T. Wallington moves around near his home in a rural Flint area weigh up to nearly 10 tons. And by himself, he moves these behemoth playthings, not with . . . → Read More: Man intends to construct his own kind of Stonehenge